THE SOCIAL NETWORK

http://www.thesocialnetwork-movie.com/

USA 2010  Directed by: David Fincher  Written by: Aaron Sorkin  Book by: Ben Mezrich  Produced by: David Fincher, Scott Rudin, Dana Brunetti, Michael De Luca, Cean Chaffin, Kevin Spacey  Cinematography by: Jeff Cronenweth  Editing by: Kirk Baxter, Angus Wall  Music by: Trent Reznor, Atticus Ross  Cast: Jesse Eisenberg, Andrew Garfield, Justin Timberlake, Brenda Song, Rooney Mara, Rashida Jones, Armie Hammer, Max Minghella, Joseph Mazello

Facebook: a social and business phenomenon that made Mark Zuckerberg the youngest billionaire in the world – $25 billion – all in a matter of 40 days. That is not luck; it’s an anomaly. That is a story that should be told. It’s a story that would intrigue everyone on the planet, since just about everyone is a member of Facebook.

The movie opens with Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse Eisenberg) having an intellectual debate with his girlfriend in a bar. Mark’s main concern isn’t about the topics at hand, but to convince his girlfriend that no matter the issue, he must come out the winner. And this sets off the premise for the movie and distills Mark, an undergrad at Harvard’s computer science faculty, down to the simple aim – toes are about to be stepped on.

Since this film is a biopic, the main plot is fleshed out for the director and writers. The magic of making it bigger than life relies very much on the cast to magnify the personalities of the story. Here, the cast was brilliant. Jesse Eisenberg’s motor mouth made the audience believe that he had the IQ to deflate anyone’s spirit, including that of an experienced attorney. Andrew Garfield’s Eduardo Saverin (Zuckerberg’s partner) was the perfect tool for Zuckerberg’s strategy of bringing Facebook to life, and to be finally betrayed by the very same guy. Eduardo’s downfall was slow and transparent. It was a key ingredient to make the audience see just to what degree an egomaniac like Zuckerberg is.

I must say, kudos to Justin Timberlake for portraying the slippery, and very entertaining, Sean Parker of Napster’s fame. His greasing and assistance to Zuckerberg’s ascension were sharp and deserves some kind of recognition. It proved Timberlake as a notable actor. Although, at the end of the story, there’s no wrap-up as to what happened to Sean Parker. Guess you’ll have to Google him to find out.

“The Social Network” was a fast-paced, popcorn-worthy feat, and handled like a tight drum by David Fincher. However, with Fincher’s bystander style, it never brought any of the characters to my heart, aside from Sean Parker, who kept everybody at an arm’s length because he’s a slippery leach anyway. The context of  “The Social Network” is hugely popular with all of us with a LAN connection. And so I wonder, would it hold its own ground if it was fiction?

 

 

 

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