Posts Tagged ‘Daniel Wu’

HOT SUMMER DAYS [CHUEN SING YIT LUEN – YIT LAT LAT | 全城热恋热辣辣]

2010/08/14

http://movie.foxmovies.com.tw/

HONG KONG / CHINA / USA 2010  Directed by: Tony Chan, Wing Shya Written by: Wing Shya Produced by: Fruit Chan, Paul Cheng  Cinematography by: Sion Michel  Editing by: Wenders Li  Music by: Eddie Chung Yan-Tai Cast: Nicholas Tse, Jacky Cheung, Rene Liu, Vivian Hsu, Barbie Hsu, Yihong Duan, Xinbo Fu, Angela Baby, Daniel Wu, Boran Jing, Zhuoyan He, Conroy Chan Fruit Chan, Phat Chan, Maggie Cheung, Jan Lamb, Michelle Wai, Shawn Yue, Joey Yung

Nothing beats HOT SUMMER DAYS in terms of star appeal, and few movies manage to put a star-studded cast like this to good use. The comedy / satire / romance is about, surprise, hot summer days in the Chinese territories, when temperatures rise to the boiling point and people go nuts. Not nuts like in FALLING DOWN, but for everyone in HOT SUMMER DAYS the period of exceptional heat seems to throw their lives off the regular track.

In the center of the story are ex-driver Wah and unsuccessful pianist Li Yan who have an SMS-relationship but never met personally. Both struggle with their careers, working McJobs to survive instead of doing what they were destined to do. Then there’s an air conditioner repair guy who’s interested in a crazy biker chick, and a sushi master who tries to get his relationship worked out with writer Wasabi; plus many other romantic or dramatic stories that take place during this one-of-a-kind heat wave.

HOT SUMMER DAYS is a classic omnibus movie with many different stories going on at the same time. However, these are mostly not related like in other films but are only connected through the locations and the heat wave scenario. The concept works very well and trying to complicate the various plot threads would have probably diverted our attention (and probably that of the writers) unnecessarily. HOT SUMMER DAYS concentrates mostly on the characters, and that makes for charming feel-good entertainment.

It is noteworthy that HOT SUMMER DAYS is not just a bland star vehicle like most of the Chinese New Year movies that have everything except a story to tell. Despite being a romantic comedy by genre HOT SUMMER DAYS is a serious movie indeed; whether or not all the stories have the depth you expect is a question everyone has to answer for her-/himself. But overall the movie is an example of discerning entertainment – maybe that isn’t too surprising after all, seeing one of the “heroes” of the independent Hong Kong cinema involved in the production, Fruit Chan of MADE IN HONG KONG / LITTLE CHEUNG / DURIAN DURIAN fame).

HOT SUMMER DAYS is spot-on mainstream cinema that at the same time is indie enough to satisfy true film buffs. While nothing’s perfect, the movie knows very well how to balance black humor, serious moments and the lightness of being. HOT SUMMER DAYS is enjoyable from beginning to end, proving that it all comes down to a big idea, good story and a non-fuzzy way to tell it.

J.


DIM SUM: INSEPARABLE [XING YING BU LI | 形影不离]

2010/08/13

I am not a big fan of Chinese-Western collaboration movies, but maybe INSEPARABLE turns out better than usual. A young man is going through a difficult time in his life, encountering problems at work as much as at home with his wife. All that changes when he meets a mysterious foreigner who has not just a little impact on Li’s life. INSEPARABLE is directed by Dayyan Eng and stars the fabulous Kevin Spacey alongside Daniel Wu, Beibi Gong, Ni Yan, Peter Stormare, Kenneth Tsang and Mo Zhang.

J.


TRIPLE TAP [CHEUNG WONG CHI WONG | QIANG WANG ZHI WANG | 鎗王之王]

2010/08/05

http://www.facebook.com/TripleTapMovie

HONG KONG 2010  Directed by: Derek Yee Written by: Derek Yee, Chun Tin Nam, Lau Ho Leung Produced by: Henry Fong  Cinematography: Anthony Pun  Editing: Kwong Chi-Leung  Music: Peter Kam  Cast: Louis Koo, Daniel Wu, Charlene Choi, Li Bingbing, Chapman To, Alex Fong, Lam Suet, Andrew Lin, Kenny Lo

A blind man would find a plot quicker than TRIPLE TAP does: Derek Yee’s movie is an amazing disaster with at least as many plot holes as bullets fired throughout its ninety-something minutes running time.

DOUBLE TAP was a quite solid B-movie, but let’s be honest, it doesn’t exactly qualify for a sequel. With a well-known and rudimental storyline, two main actors, a few fine action sequences and otherwise nothing noteworthy at all DOUBLE TAP was the kind of flick you watch when your satellite TV signal drops out during a thunderstorm or as an appetizer on a movie night with friends.

Yee nevertheless was inspired to do another installment, so now let’s have a look at the “improvements” over the original (I assume the objective of a sequel is to excel): an incredibly confusing story with Louis Koo playing a fund manager (!) who is also one of the best marksmen (!!) in town (aren’t we all leading a double life as master shooter), a heist that doesn’t make sense, actors that have the same what-am-I-doing-in-this-movie expression on their face as Andy Lau in FUTURE X-COPS, very talkative dialogues (while having nothing to say), a lot of male camaraderie that borders on gayness (I hope the way Wu and Koo are looking deep into each other’s eyes all the time was scripted; otherwise…) and a plethora of entirely unrealistic plot threads, plot points and behavior of all characters.

During the first third you’ll wonder what TRIPLE TAP is all about; by the end of the last third you may still not have comprehended more. Between the opening and the closing credits some shootouts happen, murders, police investigations, huge amounts of money are juggled with, women come and go dropping stupid one-liners. I’d say you simply stop caring after a while if you’d ever started to care in the first place. It never comes to the point that we feel for anyone in the movie, or are interested to find out what’s behind the heist and the beef these guys have with each other.

All we wanted from DOUBLE TAP was a bit of after hours action. All we get from TRIPLE TAP is three times the B-ness. A few aspects about the movie may be quite ok, but when all is said and done there can be no doubt that TRIPLE TAP’s most prominent feature is causing fatigue. If boredom was currency, Derek Yee would be a billionaire.

J.