Posts Tagged ‘Nicholas Tse’

SHAOLIN a.k.a. THE NEW SHAOLIN TEMPLE [XIN SHAO LIN SI | 新少林寺]

2011/02/13

http://www.emp.hk/title.php?film_id=66

HONG KONG 2010  Directed by: Benny Chan  Written by: Chi Kwong Cheung, Cheung Tan, Alan Yuen  Produced by: Benny Chan, Albert Lee Cinematography by: Anthony Pun Editing by: Chi Wai Yau   Music by: Nicholas Errera  Cast: Andy Lau, Nicholas Tse, Bingbing Fan, Jackie Chan, Jacky Wu, Yu Xing, Xin Xin Xiong

Armies march, bullets fly, monks pray and fight, evil lords say evil things while Jackie Chan provides comic relief – all orchestrated by Benny KILLER CLOWNS FROM OUTER SPACE Chan.

SHAOLIN or THE NEW SHAOLIN TEMPLE is an update of Jet Li’s debut from 1982, but is mostly related by name and concept, not so much through storyline or characters. Released closely to Chinese New Year 2011 it is one of the less commercial almost-CNY-films, however tries to draw in the crowds with household names (Andy Lau, Jackie Chan et.al.) and big PR (concentrating on budgets, locations, stars etc.). So how did it turn out?

Let me answer this question by going into a few details. SHAOLIN is, in principle, supposed to be a martial arts movie, and I believe that is what most people who know the Jet Li film or any of the other Shaolin-themed flicks of the past decades expect. What sense does it make therefore to cast an ageing star and non-martial-artist (Lau) as the hero, an ageing martial arts star solely as comedian (Chan) and a few younger, more capable fighters as cannon fodder? None, right. Also, you wouldn’t expect SHAOLIN to be primarily an epic tale of rival warlords and the westernization of China, repeating pretty much what last year’s blockbusters have featured well enough. SHAOLIN pays relatively little attention to Shaolin, the monks and the martial arts heritage, instead loses itself in confusing plot threads, personal feuds and vaguely developed characters who mostly contribute nothing to the development of the story, which by the way would work quite as well without the Shaolin.

As expected, Benny Chan’s direction has no focus, resulting in a movie that seems randomly assembled, with various units filming all kinds of scenes and a failed attempt to patch things together. One again Mr. Chan proves to be a stranger to coherence as much as a stranger to the more traditional martial arts cinema, as well as having little eye for details. The extensive wirework feels outdated and repetitive, frankly speaking it’s unimpressive, the way the action scenes are captured lacks verve and inspiration, the extensive use of doubles is too obvious and many special effects seem out-of-place. What I found most lackluster is the fight choreography, as the film passes by without a single original idea to beef up the action. And the training sequences of the monks are a bit funny to watch, as their positions and movements never seem aligned correctly – the choreography of any Lady Gaga show is more precise than those training sequences.

Thematically, SHAOLIN is by the book, featuring ideas like brotherhood, hierarchy, code of honor, love, trust and betrayal in A-Z order, ticking off one by one from the must-have-ingredients list. The most remarkable message of the film, especially bearing in mind that Chinese New Year was around the corner, is that materialism and pursuit of money shouldn’t be our main goals in life (SHAOLIN doesn’t really answer the question what should be instead, though). So in light of the ever money-centered CNY SHAOLIN tries to make a point, but I am not sure if the audience will really get it or mostly miss the one or two respective lines of dialogue by Andy Lau’s character.

I don’t know what others have seen in SHAOLIN, but as far as I am concerned SHAOLIN is an exceptionally uninteresting film, a whopping two hours of boredom, a revue of incoherent scenes and plot threads leading nowhere, a mixed bag of whatever sprung the makers’ minds. What were they thinking? Armies march, bullets fly, monks pray and fight, evil lords say evil things while Jackie Chan provides comic relief.

J.

 

 

 

 


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THE STOOL PIGEON a.k.a. THE BEAST STALKER 2 [SIN YAN | XIAN REN | 铫人]

2010/09/09

http://www.emp.hk/

http://www.facebook.com/EmperorMotionPictures

HONG KONG 2010  Directed by: Dante Lam  Written by: Dante Lam, Wai Lun Ng  Produced by: Candy Leung, Dai Song, Zhongjun Wang, Albert Yeung  Cinematography by: Chong-To Tse  Editing by: Ki-Hop Chan, Matthew Hui  Music by: Henry Lai Cast: Nick Cheung, Nicholas Tse, Lunmei Kwai, Kai Chi Liu, Yi Lu, Pu Miao, Yi Lu, Sherman Chung, Deep Ng, Philip Keung, Jing-Hung Kwok, Shing-Cheung Lee, Rob Lok, Yeung Ming Wan

It’s getting a wee bit too obvious now that Dante Lam remakes his one script time and again; had there not been THE SNIPER in between THE BEST STALKER and FIRE OF CONSCIENCE (as well as THE STOOL PIGEON), we would have noticed that probably earlier: THE STOOL PIGEON follows the outline of FIRE OF CONSCIENCE faithfully and mimics quite a few elements of THE BEAST STALKER.

The good news is that even on a bad day Dante Lam, in his current form, can outstrip most of Hong Kong’s crime dramas: just like its predecessor, THE STOOL PIGEON approximates the works of Michael Mann, taking its story about cops and robbers to the mean streets of Kowloon and the grim world of organized crime. Nick Cheung plays inspector Don who frequently uses informants (so-called stool pigeons) willing to rat others out for money. The problem with that is the informants are a volatile, and dangerous, species that cannot easily be trusted, while on the other hand they are living in constant fear for their lives due to their cooperation with the police.

When Don learns about a jewelry heist that will go down shortly, he tries to infiltrate the gang lead by a notorious criminal called Barbarian to prevent the worst. Ghost Jr., an ex-con and underground racing ace, seems to be the right choice to be Don’s stool pigeon for this mission, but what Don doesn’t know is that Ghost Jr. has some serious issues to deal with, including a sister who works as a prostitute to clear the family’s debt. But once things are set in motion there is no turning back and everyone gets dragged through what’s probably the most heinous experience of his/her life.

Dante Lam has meticulously organized his story universe: the characterization, the motivations, the interwoven plot threads, the duel between the seemingly good, the bad and the ugly, all that is well thought-out, very well scripted and flawlessly filmed. Some even rush to the judgment that Nick Cheung and Nicholas Tse both deliver their best performances so far, just as the movie has been hailed as this year’s best Hong Kong movie and safe award winner. Yet, I wouldn’t fully agree (the movie will probably win awards though). Despite the script being somewhat too clinical for my taste there is basically nothing much to complain about, but to put things in perspective let’s have another look at FIRE OF CONSCIENCE without indulging the pleasures of side-by-side comparisons too much.

For one thing, THE STOOL PIGEON lacks originality as FIRE was there first. Then, I feel that FIRE OF CONSCIENCE always found the sweet spot: its action, violence, emotions and gripping drama were taken to the edge, but never beyond that point. In comparison, THE STOOL PIGEON often seems exaggerated and as a result less believable; it’s like Mr. Lam forgot when to stop, when enough is enough. More than once the actors are forced to exceed their capabilities: the line they are crossing may be thin, but it’s there. Their discomfort is noticeable, just as some side plots are clearly taken too far. THE STOOL PIGEON is losing focus and is drifting away sometimes at the expense of the action as well as the film’s overall intensity. Too much is going on, and too little of that contributes to character or story development.

That doesn’t mean that it’s not appreciable to see a rather complex story laid out in front of us amid an overwhelming amount of McScripts, but we should also not forget that complexity must not distract from the intrinsic conflict and the morale the tale aims to tell. I believe FIRE OF CONSCIENCE did a better job in staying very close to its protagonists and its deeper insights of the human condition; all along the way however it threw in many complications for texture without disrupting the flow of the film or its impact.

It would be a preposterous demand to ask for a more stringent script next time as we must be thankful for what Mr. Lam has achieved recently, but there can be no doubt that THE STOOL PIGEON is losing momentum here and there, is getting too talkative at times and overall misses punch. THE STOOL PIGEON is anything but suave, but it’s like all characters are set on a collision course and then make a lot of detours before finally clashing.

Despite the honorable attempt to excel FIRE OF CONSCIENCE Mr. Lam’s THE STOOL PIGEON is more detached from its characters and their perceived realities (which were the key driver for their actions): while it is still a superior thriller, gripping drama and fast-paced action movie THE STOOL PIGEON suffers from the filmmaker’s dilemma to either produce a carbon copy of a great predecessor or to throw it all overboard and start anew. Mr. Lam couldn’t decide, and as a result is trying too hard to be more diverse, more intelligent and necessarily different without really improving his well-crafted formula.

THE STOOL PIGEON, while standing out as clearly above-average thriller, is a variation on a strong theme that is falling behind its own aspirations.

J.


HOT SUMMER DAYS [CHUEN SING YIT LUEN – YIT LAT LAT | 全城热恋热辣辣]

2010/08/14

http://movie.foxmovies.com.tw/

HONG KONG / CHINA / USA 2010  Directed by: Tony Chan, Wing Shya Written by: Wing Shya Produced by: Fruit Chan, Paul Cheng  Cinematography by: Sion Michel  Editing by: Wenders Li  Music by: Eddie Chung Yan-Tai Cast: Nicholas Tse, Jacky Cheung, Rene Liu, Vivian Hsu, Barbie Hsu, Yihong Duan, Xinbo Fu, Angela Baby, Daniel Wu, Boran Jing, Zhuoyan He, Conroy Chan Fruit Chan, Phat Chan, Maggie Cheung, Jan Lamb, Michelle Wai, Shawn Yue, Joey Yung

Nothing beats HOT SUMMER DAYS in terms of star appeal, and few movies manage to put a star-studded cast like this to good use. The comedy / satire / romance is about, surprise, hot summer days in the Chinese territories, when temperatures rise to the boiling point and people go nuts. Not nuts like in FALLING DOWN, but for everyone in HOT SUMMER DAYS the period of exceptional heat seems to throw their lives off the regular track.

In the center of the story are ex-driver Wah and unsuccessful pianist Li Yan who have an SMS-relationship but never met personally. Both struggle with their careers, working McJobs to survive instead of doing what they were destined to do. Then there’s an air conditioner repair guy who’s interested in a crazy biker chick, and a sushi master who tries to get his relationship worked out with writer Wasabi; plus many other romantic or dramatic stories that take place during this one-of-a-kind heat wave.

HOT SUMMER DAYS is a classic omnibus movie with many different stories going on at the same time. However, these are mostly not related like in other films but are only connected through the locations and the heat wave scenario. The concept works very well and trying to complicate the various plot threads would have probably diverted our attention (and probably that of the writers) unnecessarily. HOT SUMMER DAYS concentrates mostly on the characters, and that makes for charming feel-good entertainment.

It is noteworthy that HOT SUMMER DAYS is not just a bland star vehicle like most of the Chinese New Year movies that have everything except a story to tell. Despite being a romantic comedy by genre HOT SUMMER DAYS is a serious movie indeed; whether or not all the stories have the depth you expect is a question everyone has to answer for her-/himself. But overall the movie is an example of discerning entertainment – maybe that isn’t too surprising after all, seeing one of the “heroes” of the independent Hong Kong cinema involved in the production, Fruit Chan of MADE IN HONG KONG / LITTLE CHEUNG / DURIAN DURIAN fame).

HOT SUMMER DAYS is spot-on mainstream cinema that at the same time is indie enough to satisfy true film buffs. While nothing’s perfect, the movie knows very well how to balance black humor, serious moments and the lightness of being. HOT SUMMER DAYS is enjoyable from beginning to end, proving that it all comes down to a big idea, good story and a non-fuzzy way to tell it.

J.